Renovating Our Bird Pool: Part 1

22 Nov

Not many people are lucky enough to have their own bird hide, but here at Balaba we have our own special hide. It started a while ago when we decided to make a bird pool to attract the birds and other wildlife. We then decided to convert one of our rooms into a hide.

When I first came to Balaba in 2008, we were surrounded by forest and there were only a few compounds in the area. But in only nine years, most of the forest around us has been cut down as people move into the land and begin to build. The first thing they do is to cut down the trees – not only does this limit the shade they have, but of course it also destroys the wildlife habitat too.

At Balaba, we have quite a large area of land, so Lamin has left a ring of forest around the compound in the middle, and we have many mature trees. The loss of the forest around us means that we do attract lots of birds, as they have very little forest left in the area now.

Lamin made the bird pool a couple of years ago, but like everything here, it’s deteriorated quite a lot, so last week he decided to give it a bit of a makeover.

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First he added a new layer of cement to the large pool – it seemed to have developed a slow leak.

He also patched up our clay bowl that had a crack in it.

Then he cut some long shoots from our malina trees (which grow very straight) and fitted them horizontally to hold the fence posts in place.

The fence behind the pools had been badly munched by termites (if you want to read more about the damage termites can do, check our my earlier posts The War Against the Termites and Giving the Termites Some Food for Thought). Some of the fence posts had almost been eaten right through, and the leaves were in very poor condition.

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Termite damage to the fence post

Lamin checked every fence post, rooting out the ones that had gone too far, and realigning those that could be reused. Pampuran sticks have wicked razor-sharp edges to them. If you cut yourself, the wound gets inflamed very easily, so they need to be handled with care.

Lamin also removed the old leaves which were in a very fragile condition.

Next he cut some palm leaves to size with his cutlass (machete), and painstakingly constructed the fence with a patchwork of leaves.

This created a barrier that (hopefully) will keep pigs, goats and cows at bay but let small birds through. Animals are allowed to roam free during the dry season, and it’s amazing how much damage they can do in a short time!

Birds always like to land on a nearby perch before flying down to the ground to check that the coast is clear and free from predators. So we used more malina branches to make two long perches above the fence – this also gives me some good photo opportunities.

Finally, Lamin replaced the clay bowl that we fill with water.

Strangely, it’s the larger birds that like this one. One of the funniest sights I’ve seen is a huge African harrier hawk trying to fit into a small bowl for a bath!

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Next time I’ll tell you about how Lamin finished the renovations.

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3 Responses to “Renovating Our Bird Pool: Part 1”

  1. Mike Seuters November 25, 2017 at 10:58 am #

    great job Lamin! I coming to check it out soon 😉
    regards Mike

    • Elizabeth Manneh November 25, 2017 at 12:43 pm #

      Thanks Mike! We’re looking forward to welcoming you. We’ve told the birds they have to wear their best feathers and pose for your photos! 😉

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Renovating Our Bird Pool: Part 2 | Life in The Gambia - November 25, 2017

    […] In my last post I told you how Lamin began to renovate our bird pool – you can read all about that here. […]

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